What does your brand say about you?


What does your brand say about you? What makes your brand? What does say about your brand? What makes a good brand? What makes your brand good? Is it a perception or a reality? Is it the way you look? Is it the way you act? Is it the way others interact with you? When people think about you what do they say? When people see you what do they think? Is there a personality? Is it personal? Have you ever had to rebrand for some reason? Did it take a lot of effort? Did you have to make a significant change?


Day 14: 2020 Hindsight
— The 49-Week Challenge – Day 14 —

Hindsight is 2020

Want to join me in the challenge? Click Day 14 link above or want to join link here to join me and sign up.

Let’s share our takeaways from today’s reading! Did you catch and promises to trust? Did you catch any commands to obey? Did you catch any truths to embrace? Did you catch any warnings to heed? Did you catch any encouragement to rest in? What did you learn about God? What did you learn about yourself? What did you learn about the world? What verse stood out most to you today?

If you are interested in getting together or sharing the information together, please let me know through the comment section below, through email, or even through text messages.


Today’s reading from God’s Word – the Bible comes to us from: (I have chosen to use NIV translation, but feel free to choose whichever version you feel more comfortable with)


‘For my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the sight of all nations: a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of your people Israel.” ‘

— Luke 2:30-32

My Notes:

  • This devotional is setup for reflection each seventh day.
  • This 14th day gives opportunity to not only reflect but also to share with others
  • Today’s devotional gives us things to consider like:
    • Praise Him for who He is and what He’s like.
    • Confess any sin.
    • Thank Him for complete forgiveness through Jesus, for other blessings in your life, for answers to prayer, and for what He has done for you.
    • Share your worries with Him, and ask Him for what you and others need.
    • Ask Him for guidance, and place your trust in Him.
    • Share with someone a verse or thought that impacted you from the past six days of reading.
  • Matthew Henry’s Concise commentary shares:
    • 2:25-35 The same Spirit that provided for the support of Simeon’s hope, provided for his joy. Those who would see Christ must go to his temple. Here is a confession of his faith, that this Child in his arms was the Saviour, the salvation itself, the salvation of God’s appointing. He bids farewell to this world. How poor does this world look to one that has Christ in his arms, and salvation in his view! See here, how comfortable is the death of a good man; he departs in peace with God, peace with his own conscience, in peace with death. Those that have welcomed Christ, may welcome death. Joseph and Mary marvelled at the things which were spoken of this Child. Simeon shows them likewise, what reason they had to rejoice with trembling. And Jesus, his doctrine, and people, are still spoken against; his truth and holiness are still denied and blasphemed; his preached word is still the touchstone of men’s characters. The secret good affections in the minds of some, will be revealed by their embracing Christ; the secret corruptions of others will be revealed by their enmity to Christ. Men will be judged by the thoughts of their hearts concerning Christ. He shall be a suffering Jesus; his mother shall suffer with him, because of the nearness of her relation and affection.
  • Elliot’s Commentary shares:
    • The Greek word is not the usual feminine noun expressing the abstract idea of salvation, but the neuter of the adjective—that which brings or works out salvation. Its use here is probably determined by its appearance in the LXX. version of Isaiah 52:10, as quoted in Luke 3:6. He saw in that infant child the means of deliverance for the world.
    • Literally, of all peoples. The word expresses the universality of the salvation which the next verse contemplates in its application to the two great divisions of the human family.
    • Literally, for a revelation to the Gentiles. The idea is strictly that of the withdrawal of the “veil spread over all nations” of Isaiah 25:7.
    • Here, again, the language is the natural utterance of the hope of the time, not the after-thought of later years. The Christ whom Israel had rejected was hardly “the glory of the people” when St. Luke wrote his Gospel.
  • Imagine being there to hold baby Jesus as he was about to be dedicated after having waited years for his arrival and with the promise of God that you would see him before you pass on.
  • It is amazing that it is called out for both gentiles and the people of Israel. It is for all people!

As day 14 of 2020 begins, I would hate to miss giving the opportunity to anyone who hasn’t received Jesus into their lives as their Lord and Savior an opportunity to make the decision this early into 2020 and the blessing to get to live out the rest of 2020 in that power and that truth and that hope.

If you would like to receive Jesus as your Lord and Savior, why not join me in this prayer?

Did you pray with me? Would you be willing to leave me a comment so that I can pray with and for you about such an incredible decision? Or if you don’t feel comfortable leaving a comment on my blog, why not email or text me instead?


Today’s devotional comes from Life.Church. For more information, please visit www.life.church — Thank you Life.Church for sharing this reading plan through Bible.com

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